How to Improve Part I

If you’ve been on our forum, you’ve seen some good questions.  One came in the other day that was really good:

I was wondering if you can tell me why there is an abbreviated follow through when the Y and L drills are performed? What purpose does this serve, and why wouldn’t you just finish the swing to the top of the back swing like you would on a full swing? Thanks!

Here was my reply:

This is a good question.  I think a lot of people struggle with the length of the swing of the Y and L drills.  

If you take the correct Y drill backswing and don’t try to hit the ball far, there should be no need to have a follow thru more than what is Rx’d.  The mistake golfers make is they try to help the ball with their right hand and this produces a long follow thru.  If you take away this ‘help’ you won’t need a big follow thru.

Another reason we have the abbreviated follow thru is that it allows you to check yourself and be your own teacher.  If you do the proper follow thru and look down (or even better you have a mirror) and see that you’ve flipped/chicken winged, then you know what you need to work on.  However, if you go ahead and do a full follow thru, you’ll never get that feedback and you’ll never improve.

A final piece of this puzzle is awareness.  When we tell most golfers to do a Y drill, what they perform is a full swing at about 50%.   That shows a total lack of awareness of your body and your swing.  When you can correctly perform the Y and L drills, you’ll have a great awareness that most golfers don’t and this is another key to improvement.

Getting rid of the ‘help’/flip/wing, learning to coach yourself, and better awareness are key benefits you receive by doing the Y and L drills properly and if you do a full follow thru you don’t get these benefits.

Hope this helps,

JNJr.

I bring this to your attention, dear reader, for 2 reasons:

1. so you’d see this question/reply as I think it is very important

2. to discuss the nature of improving your golf swing.    

So how do you improve?   Sometimes it’s good to look at ways you won’t improve, such as mindlessly hitting balls a la Charles Barkley on the Golf Channel.  When you hit balls, nearly 100% of your focus goes towards the ball, impact with the ball and where the ball goes.  But changing your swing really has nothing to do with the ball.  So, why are we hitting balls when we try to change our swings?  

Part II coming soon……

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